Source: OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY submitted to
REDUCING INJURY TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CROPS CAUSED BY DRIFT OR VOLATILITY OF HERBICIDES APPLIED TO ROW CROPS
Sponsoring Institution
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Project Status
NEW
Funding Source
Reporting Frequency
Annual
Accession No.
0226012
Grant No.
2011-51181-30645
Project No.
OHO01080-SS
Proposal No.
2011-01491
Multistate No.
(N/A)
Program Code
SCRI
Project Start Date
Sep 1, 2011
Project End Date
Aug 31, 2012
Grant Year
2011
Project Director
Doohan, D.
Recipient Organization
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY
1680 MADISON AVENUE
WOOSTER,OH 44691
Performing Department
Horticulture and Crop Science
Non Technical Summary
This proposal addresses a critically important emerging threat to the specialty crop industry: environmental disease induced by off-target movement of 2,4-D and dicamba herbicides. The imminent commercial release of field crops with genetically engineered tolerance to 2,4-D and dicamba is expected to greatly increase the use of these growth-regulating herbicides in addition to changing the application timing to coincide with more susceptible growth stages of non-target plants. Specialty crop farmers believe that despite the best intentions of farmers, commercial applicators, seed companies, and the pesticide industry this will inevitably lead to sensitive crop diseases because of increased spray drift and movement of volatiles. Despite strong opposition from some stakeholder groups it is likely that commercialization of these technologies will occur; however, we contend that the predicted worst case scenario of increased specialty crop disease over wide areas of the country, bankruptcy, polarization, distrust, antipathy and lawsuits within our agricultural communities can be minimized. To achieve our long-term goal of facilitating a better model for introduction and adoption of agricultural technologies we propose a Research and Extension Planning Project that will bring together stakeholders representing the diversity of science and opinion on this subject at a multi -state and -institutional, transdisciplinary, stakeholder driven Symposium and Workshop. Upon conclusion of the planning project phase we intend to submit a Coordinated Agricultural Project proposal of national scope to address the disease threat using a systems approach.
Animal Health Component
25%
Research Effort Categories
Basic
25%
Applied
25%
Developmental
50%
Classification

Knowledge Area (KA)Subject of Investigation (SOI)Field of Science (FOS)Percent
8031199114015%
8031199300010%
8031499114015%
8031499300010%
9031199114015%
9031199300010%
9031499114015%
9031499300010%
Goals / Objectives
We believe that the predicted worst case scenario resulting from the release of new GMO crops can be avoided (i.e. increased specialty crop disease over wide areas of the country, bankruptcy, polarization, distrust, antipathy and lawsuits within our agricultural communities). To achieve our long-term goal of facilitating a better model for introduction and adoption of agricultural technologies we propose a Research and Extension Planning Project that will bring together stakeholders representing the diversity of science and opinion on this subject at a multi -state and -institutional, transdisciplinary, stakeholder driven Symposium and Workshop. Upon conclusion of the planning project phase we intend to submit a Coordinated Agricultural Project proposal of national scope to address the disease threat using a systems approach. We plan to accomplish the objectives of this application by pursuing the following specific aims: Pre-Symposium Aims: (1) Members of our working group will work within their respective research and professional networks to identify and recruit additional participants for a research symposium and workshop that is the focus of this proposal. (2) We will solicit input from the following stakeholders using focus groups and surveys to shape the form and outcomes of the proposed symposium and workshop: specialty crop growers, row-crop farmers, commercial applicators, industry representatives, non-profit farm advocacy groups, and potential symposium participants. These will be conducted to assess their beliefs, perceptions, and attitudes toward weed management, herbicide use, stacked traits and intellectual capital control, and potential unintended consequences. The WebEx video conferencing system available at Ohio State University will be used to coordinate planning activities. Stakeholder Symposium and Workshop Aims: (3) Define and rank importance of agroecosystem perturbations likely to occur following wide-spread adoption of 2,4-D and/ or dicamba tolerant crop technology. Including topics such as systemic impact on production systems, existing and potential markets for rural enterprises, human ecology, pollinators, business structures, consumers, policy, rural communities, and the environment. (4) Develop forums for discussing systemic impacts across all stakeholder groups. (5) Identify elements of conflict or knowledge gaps that most require research, education, or additional industry discourse. (6) Chart a methodology and timeline for identifying those systems and practices within which the needs of most stakeholders can be met, as well as those for which compromise is not possible. (7) Define a risk communication protocol that will foster broad-based community values while protecting the rights and opportunities of individuals and corporations. (8) Identify appropriate research sites, subjects and methods of study, and additional collaborators who enhance our team's areas of expertise to develop a strategy for designing a full SCRI CAP proposal. Post-Symposium and Workshop Aims: (9) Preparation of a full USDA SCRI CAP proposal by the next Request for Applications.
Project Methods
We will use a structured conference format in which participants will include the PDs, collaborators and their chosen representatives, and other stakeholders identified through the process defined below and in Part 6. Using this format, all sides of the herbicide-induced disease syndrome working group will have the opportunity to cover areas of conflict among opponents and proponents of the new 2,4-D and dicamba-tolerant crop technologies. We will use five principles, outlined by Chess and Purcell (1999), which we will adhere to in engaging the diverse groups of actors. The first will be to ensure the goals and expected outcomes are clearly articulated among stakeholders. Second, we will invest time in advanced planning to ensure that all stakeholders have the opportunity to participate and provide input. Third, the form of participation will be adjusted as the project unfolds to meet the needs of the group and reach our outcome goals. For instance, participation will take the form of focus groups, surveys, and phone interviews, outreach documents calling for comment, and the symposium and workshop in the planning stage. Four, during CAP planning and development an emphasis will be placed on creating multiple forms of participation to meet the capacity and needs of stakeholders. Five, we will collect feedback from stakeholders on the various forms of participation.